Wednesday, July 30, 2014

10 easy steps to convert Manjaro Linux installation back to native Arch Linux


After my previous review of Manjaro Linux Manjaro KDE! An unpromised Release with promised breakages !! things have changed a lot on Manjaro side and it is a much mature project with a huge users numbers and many more release and different versions. The project is much stable and is getting better everyday. I installed the MATE version and used it for a couple of days and it was fun but then I decided to get back the base to native Arch Linux keeping the skeleton designed by Manjaro team as it is.

Here is how I did it and it worked for me perfectly.


1 . Before doing anything else just change the pacman.config settings as below, you can copy/paste these settings if you like to

#
# /etc/pacman.conf
#
#
# GENERAL OPTIONS
#
[options]
SigLevel = Never
LocalFileSigLevel = Optional
HoldPkg = pacman glibc
SyncFirst = pacman
Architecture = auto
Color
CheckSpace
ILoveCandy
#
# REPOSITORIES
#
[core]
Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist
[extra]
Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist
[community]
Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist

2 . Change pacman mirrors to these, again you can copy/paste these settings if you like to keep these mirrors for you

# Arch Linux repository mirrorlist

Server = http://mirror.us.leaseweb.net/archlinux/$repo/os/$arch
Server = http://archlinux.polymorf.fr/$repo/os/$arch

3. Open /etc/ with a file manager as root ( I did it as thunar root ) . Manually change these files contents and make one file back as given below

a ) /etc/manjaro-release.bak
b) pacman-mirrors.conf.bak
c) /etc/os-release : change conetnts to these

NAME="Arch Linux"
ID=arch
PRETTY_NAME="Arch Linux"
ANSI_COLOR="0;36"
HOME_URL="https://www.archlinux.org/"
SUPPORT_URL="https://bbs.archlinux.org/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="https://bugs.archlinux.org/"

d) /etc/issue : change conetnts to these
change conetnts to these
Arch Linux \r (\l)

e ) /etc/lsb-release : change conetnts to these

LSB_VERSION=1.4
DISTRIB_ID=Arch
DISTRIB_RELEASE=rolling
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Arch Linux"

4 . Do # pacman -Syu and deal with the dpendencies if any arise accordingly , I did not meet any so I did a full upgrade of all the packages without any issue.

5 . Install Arch Linux stock kernel and its headers files

# pacman -Sy linux linux-headers

You have to deal with any dependencies if arise manually yourself.

6 . Install nvidia and its dependencies if any if you are on Nvidia Graphic card like me. Again you would know how to deal with the dependencies if you get any issues.

# pacman -Sy nvidia nvidia-utils

7. Search manually for all Manjaro related packages and remove them.

8. Do # pacman -Syu once again and you will get warnings that some packages installed are newer than the available on mirrors/repositories , you can reinstall them or live with them , I personally removed all those packages and reinstalled them from Arch Linux repositories.

9. You might end up with your mouse freezing up , I tried to know the reason but could not find one but did find a fix which works

a ) Installing the tlp package

b ) $ sudo tlp usb

10 . Remove all Manjaro related wallpapers and eye-candy effects , icons,buttons and you are ready to reboot and enjoy your Manjaro Linux fully converted back to native Arch Linux.




14 comments:

Forge said...

Thanks, this was a big help. I've found a few leftover packages that I just can't remove, though, like mhwd. Trying to remove that makes pacman try to remove 90% or more of the system. Is there an equivalent to the gentoo "emerge --remove --oneshot --nodeps packagename" command? Tear it out and resolve the deps later?

Forge said...

Still not sure how to do it with pacman, but it was pretty simple to do it with octopi. Select the package(s) to remove, then use ctrl-a to deselect all the other removals.

Dr.Saleem Khan Marwat said...

sudo pacman -Rdd command will work fine for you

Niklas Khor said...

Thank you so much for this. I think Manjaro will work for people who need to get up and running in five minutes, but not for me. It is crowded with things I dont want and never will need.

So i'm changing back to Arch your way.
But what do you mean with the part of changing the manjaro-release file and others to "back"?
Can you please explain that step for with the a, b, c, operations a little more in depth?
Thanks again for this!
Blankisten

Nicolas Danelon said...

this steps works with Antergos?

Leonardo Véliz said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Leonardo Véliz said...

It also works if you install Arch Linux kernel into Manjaro system, so it should work too with any other Arch-based distro.

Anonymous said...

For me, the conversion to Arch is not complete. Even after doing all of the above steps, when updating the kernel, it continues to build the kernel per Philip Mueller from manjaro.org. "pacman -Sy linux linux-headers" installs X.X.X-X-MANJARO instead of X.X.X-X version. The build is not the same. For example, if the plymouth package used by Manjaro has been removed, the build complains that it is not there. Is another step that was left out above?

Jakob Greve said...

I Read this and found it intriguing. For me it was more interesting that you could go unstable which comes more or less directly from arch - Only 3 days behind. https://wiki.manjaro.org/index.php?title=Change_Selected_Pacman_Branch

There is a myth that Arch is the only way and newer is always better. For a productive system this is far from the case. I've tried Arch and Antergos and found that with my limited skills and time Manjaro is the system that best suits my needs.

You do need to uninstall alot and set up your own system, but you don't have to go through the hassle of doing any and every config file by hand or systemd for that matter.

To me it's a huge plus that you can check the unstable / Arch branch by changing two letters and doing a mirror/ system-update so I'd recommend for anyone considering changing their system into Arch to look up the updates in unstable to see if there's anything they really need. As such I don't see any reason to leave Manjaro if you posses that knowledge and follow the instructions from the link in this text. If you wish to install Arch you should either do it the (hard) Arch way or use a script like Arch anywhere. https://arch-anywhere.org/

I'm only writing this cos if you're like me you're most likely on the lookout for something newer and better. But then again that's also the segment for whom a "quick and dirty shortcut" is most appealing. Anyways thanks to the great doctor for giving this tip and inspiration.

Stank Diddly said...

@Jakob - do you REALLY feel compelled to use "cos" vs. because? #retard

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Alan Davis said...

I followed this recipe a few months ago. I have been pleased overall, even though there apparently have been some new wrinkles added ;between Arch and Manjaro. One wrinkle, though is a glaring issue: Manjaro's boot manager does not surrender control over the boot and kernels, at lesat the way I have it set up. I hope now that I am building a PC I can install in the EFI manner, and use Arch out of the box.

When I run #uname -a, the Manjaro kernel is still in evidence, even though I have updated the kernel about a dozen times.

In general, my observations suggest that manjaro commandeers the boot manager in a way that is not compatible with other distros. This may be my doing, due to my clupartieless regarding EFI boot setup. The installation guides for some distros are unclear about the specifics of paritioning and mounting of EFI.

So it is possible that among Ubuntu, Manjaro, and at lesat one other OS that I used different paritions when mounting.

OTOH, does Manjaro use a different scheme?

Bottom line: I need to figure out why my system still wants to be Manjaro.

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Tom said...

Actually you have to run “pacman -Qnq | pacman -Syy -” to get Arch system. “pacman -Sy” will only update outdated packages to newer Arch versions and I'm not even sure of that since “y” only downloads newer repos than you have. Anyway uptodate packages won't be changed. Reinstalling all packages will also do step 3 for you.